Snow Q Crow Goes to Lewes Live Literature – Rita

Snow Q is continuing. Snow Q is branching out. Here is Snow Q’s actor Rita Suszek talking about her recent performance of Maria Jastrzębska’s Crow poems. These poems were written for our collaborative project and inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s Snow Queen story in which the heroine Gerda meets a Crow on her quest.
On Thursday, 23rd of May I got to board the train from London to Eastbourne after work. I was excited – I was to bring Snow Q’s Crow poems to Lewes Live Literature! The event was part of their Outside Season and created in support of CALM – Campaign Against Living Miserably. While suicide – its results, prevention and suffering – was the main theme of the evening, the guiding quote was the one by Munia Khan: “Nothing is unreal as long as you can imagine like a crow”.Untitled
Having arrived and conferred with Mark Hewitt, who had directed Snow Q last December and was one of the organisers, I spiked my hair and put some black lipstick on, the better to emulate the Crow. Crows are strange creatures – scavengers by nature, symbolically guarding the border between life and death, tellers of stories. In the case of Snow Q, the Crow is the one who has the answers, who has lived long enough to tell stories. The poems we chose to perform speak for themselves, evoking the cold snow communist Poland, the border between Polish and English language, the walls between families and their children. They speak of loneliness and connection both, and punctuate every poignant moment with indignant caw-ing, which I was more than happy to demonstrate.
I was honoured to recite alongside the wonderful pieces that were on that night. “This is always the result”, a live narrative over a film piece, written and performed by Gus Watcham, directed by Mark Hewitt with video sequence by Abigail Norris – the piece shows a suicide attempt and its impact on one family’s life in incredible detail, unrelenting, poetic and touching at the same time. There was also poetry performed by Imo Carr and Ellie Long, Arts Award students from Eastbourne College: the poems were diverse and thoughtful, delivered beautifully. Finally, we listened to a series of music tracks by an award-winning songwriter, Elsa Hewitt: they were hypnotic, conveying both a sense of quiet and a frisson of unrest, worry, questioning; some of the songs were also layered over a video, showcasing how mental health problems can creep on us all.
To learn more about the event, take a look at this link: http://www.leweslivelit.co.uk/?location_id=110

Cover image by Dagmara Rudkin

You can read Maria Jastrzębska’s The Subsongs of Crow poems in the current issue of Poetry Wales magazine. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s